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SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences, Volume 60 , Issue 1 : 102-115(2017) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11431-015-1000-5

Coupled chemical effects of carbon dioxide and hydrogen additions on premixed lean dimethyl ether flames

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  • ReceivedDec 23, 2015
  • AcceptedJun 29, 2016
  • PublishedDec 20, 2016

Abstract

Kinetic analysis of coupled effects of CO2 and H2 additions on laminar lean premixed dimethyl ether flames is performed at atmospheric pressure. The coupled effects of H2/CO2 additions on major species, intermediate stable species and radicals are discussed and analyzed in detail. The dilution, thermal and chemical effects of H2 and CO2 are separated and identified. The results show that H2 addition can slightly mitigate the CO2 chemical effects on decreasing the temperatures, H radical concentration, acetylene mole fraction and formaldehyde concentration. After CO2 is added, the H2 chemical effects on increasing the temperatures are enhanced. DME oxidation is promoted by the H2 chemical effects, which is further strengthened by the CO2 addition. Moreover, CO2 addition can reduce the H2 chemical effects on increasing the H radical mole fraction, but strengthen the H2 chemical effects on increasing the production of HO2 and C2H2. CH2O formation can be promoted by the H2 chemical effects, which is enhanced by the CO2 addition. In actually, the H2/CO2 coupled chemical effects almost have no obvious influence on the temperatures and HO2 mole fraction. DME consumption is delayed by the H2/CO2 coupled chemical effects. Furthermore, the H2/CO2 coupled chemical effects can decrease the H radical mole fraction, CH4 concentration, C2H2 mole fraction, CH2O concentration and CH3CHO mole fraction, but increase the CO concentration.


Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51576100 & 51306091), the Jiangsu Provincial Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. BK20140034 & BK20130758), Jiangsu “Shuangchuang Program” and the Jiangsu Provincial Project of “Six Talent Summit” (Grant No. 2014-XNY-002).


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  • Figure 1

    (Color online) Flame temperature profiles with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on the temperatures with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on the temperatures with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on the temperatures.

  • Figure 2

    (Color online) DME profiles with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on DME with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on DME with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects on DME of CO2 addition with H2.

  • Figure 3

    (Color online) Rate of production of DME with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of DME with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on rate of production of DME with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on rate of production of DME.

  • Figure 4

    (Color online) Mole fraction of H radical with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on H radical with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on H radical with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on H radical.

  • Figure 5

    (Color online) Mole fractions of HO2 with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on HO2 with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on HO2 with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on HO2.

  • Figure 6

    (Color online) Mole fractions of CO with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on CO with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on CO with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on CO.

  • Figure 7

    (Color online) Mole fractions of CH4 with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on CH4 with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on CH4 with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on CH4.

  • Figure 8

    (Color online) Mole fractions of C2H2 with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on C2H2 with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on C2H2 with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on C2H2.

  • Figure 9

    (Color online) Rate of production of C2H2 with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of C2H2 with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on rate of production of C2H2 with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of C2H2 with H2.

  • Figure 10

    (Color online) Mole fractions of CH2O with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on CH2O with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on CH2O with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition with H2 on CH2O.

  • Figure 11

    (Color online) Rate of production of CH2O with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of CH2O with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on rate of production of CH2O with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of CH2O with H2.

  • Figure 12

    (Color online) Mole fractions of CH3CHO with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on CH3CHO with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on CH3CHO with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition on CH3CHO with H2.

  • Figure 13

    (Color online) Rate of production of CH3CHO with different additions. (a) Effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of CH3CHO with and without H2; (b) effects of H2 addition on rate of production of CH3CHO with and without CO2; (c) coupled effects of CO2 addition on rate of production of CH3CHO with H2.

  • Table 1   Mole fraction of compositions of blended mixtures at 1 atm with equivalence ratio 0.8a)

    No.

    R (%)

    DME

    H2

    FH2

    CO2

    FCO2

    O2

    FO2

    Ar

    1

    0

    0.063158

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0.236842

    0

    0.7

    2

    20%H2

    0.058200

    0.014550

    0

    0

    0

    0.227250

    0

    0.7

    3

    20%FH2

    0.058200

    0

    0.014550

    0

    0

    0.218250

    0.009

    0.7

    4

    20%CO2

    0.063158

    0

    0

    0.2

    0

    0.236842

    0

    0.5

    5

    20%FCO2

    0.063158

    0

    0

    0

    0.2

    0.236842

    0

    0.5

    6

    20%H2+20%CO2

    0.058200

    0.014550

    0

    0.2

    0

    0.227250

    0

    0.5

    7

    20%FH2+20%CO2

    0.058200

    0

    0.014550

    0.2

    0

    0.218250

    0.009

    0.5

    8

    20%H2+20%FCO2

    0.058200

    0.014550

    0

    0

    0.2

    0.227250

    0

    0.5

    9

    20%FH2+20%FCO2

    0.058200

    0

    0.014550

    0

    0.2

    0.218250

    0.009

    0.5

    a)FH2: fictitious H2; FCO2: fictitious CO2; FO2: fictitious O2.

  • Table 2   The peak mole fraction of H in DME/H2/CO2/Ar flames

    No.

    Peak mole fraction

    N1: NONE

    0.01086

    0.01091

    0.00957

    0.00512

    0.00802

    0.00509

    0.00788

    0.00421

    0.00669

    N2: 20%H2

    N3: 20%FH2

    N4: 20%CO2

    N5: 20%FCO2

    N6: 20%H2+20%CO2

    N7: 20%H2+20%FCO2

    N8: 20%FH2+20%CO2

    N9: 20%FH2+20%FCO2

    Chemical effects

    (ppm)

    Dilution/thermal effects (ppm)

    Single H2

    1340

    -1290

    Single CO2

    -2900

    -2840

    H2 with CO2 existed

    880

    -910

    CO2 with H2 existed

    -2790

    -3030

  • Table 3   The peak mole fraction of C2H2 in DME/H2/CO2/Ar flames

    No.

    Peak mole fraction

    N1: NOEN

    4.651×10-4

    4.052×10-4

    3.915×10-4

    2.73×10-4

    3.307×10-4

    2.346×10-4

    2.794×10-4

    2.168×10-4

    2.658×10-4

    N2: 20%H2

    N3: 20%FH2

    N4: 20%CO2

    N5: 20%FCO2

    N6: 20%H2+20%CO2

    N7: 20%H2+20%FCO2

    N8: 20%FH2+20%CO2

    N9: 20%FH2+20%FCO2

    Chemical effects (ppm)

    Dilution/thermal effects (ppm)

    Coupled effects (ppm)

    Single H2

    13.7

    -73.6

    -59.9

    Single CO2

    -57.7

    -134.4

    -192.1

    H2 with CO2 existed

    17.8

    -56.2

    -38.4

    CO2 with H2 existed

    -44.8

    -125.8

    -170.6

    H2+CO2

    -31.2

    -199.3

    -230.5

  • Table 4   The peak mole fraction of CH2O in DME/H2/CO2/Ar flames

    No

    Peak mole fraction

    N1: NONE

    0.00983

    0.00915

    0.00877

    0.00754

    0.00821

    0.00704

    0.00764

    0.00658

    0.00722

    N2: 20%H2

    N3: 20%FH2

    N4: 20%CO2

    N5: 20%FCO2

    N6: 20%H2+20%CO2

    N7: 20%H2+20%FCO2

    N8: 20%FH2+20%CO2

    N9: 20%FH2+20%CO2

    Chemical effects

    (ppm)

    Dilution/thermal effects (ppm)

    Single H2

    380

    -1060

    Single CO2

    -670

    -1620

    H2 with CO2 existed

    460

    -960

    CO2 with H2 existed

    -600

    -1510

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