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SCIENCE CHINA Technological Sciences, Volume 59 , Issue 1 : 81-92(2016) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11431-015-5954-5

A reduced combustion kinetic model for the methanol-gasoline blended fuels on SI engines

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  • ReceivedJun 22, 2015
  • AcceptedSep 7, 2015
  • PublishedOct 28, 2015

Abstract

A reduced combustion kinetic model for the methanol-gasoline blended fuels for SI engines was developed. Sensitivity analysis and rate constant variation methods were used to optimize the kinetic model. Flame propagation, shock-tube and jet-stirred reactor systems were modeled in CHEMKIN. The laminar flame speed, ignition delay time and change in concentrations of species were simulated using the reduced kinetic model. The simulation results of reduced chemical mechanism agreed well with the relevant experimental data published in the literature. The experimental investigations on engine bench were also carried out. The in-cylinder pressure and exhaust emissions were obtained by using a combustion analyzer and an FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy) spectrometer. Meanwhile, an engine in-cylinder CFD model was established in AVL FIRE and was coupled with the proposed reduced chemical mechanism to simulate the combustion process of methanol-gasoline blends. The simulated combustion process showed good agreement with the engine experimental results and the predicted emissions were found to be in accordance with the FTIR results.


Funded by

National Natural Science Foundation of China(50776078)

National Natural Science Foundation of China(amp; 51106136)


Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 50776078 & 51106136).


References

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  • Figure 1

    Change of OH and CO concentrations in the oxidation processes with different mechanisms, at the initial condition of Φ=1, T=900 K and P=10 atm.

  • Figure 2

    Reactions of highest H atom sensitivity with different equivalence ratios of Φ=0.8, 1.0 and 1.2. The initial condition of the calculation was T=400 K and P=1 atm.

  • Figure 3

    Calculated ignition flame speed of gasoline surrogate (0.5 iso- octane, 0.3 toluene, 0.1 n-heptane and 0.1 1-hexene in mole fraction) and methanol under the pressure of 1 atm. Solid lines were the results of LLNL mechanism. Dash lines were the results of RMV3.

  • Figure 4

    Calculated ignition delay times of gasoline surrogate (0.5 iso-octane, 0.3 toluene, 0.1 n-heptane and 0.1 1-hexene in mole fraction) and methanol-gasoline blends (0.5 methanol and 0.5 gasoline surrogate in mole fraction) in a wide range of operating conditions. Data collected in closed homogeneous model at stoichiometric conditions in air. Solid lines were the results of LLNL mechanism. Dash lines were the results of RMV3.

  • Figure 5

    (Color online) Shock tube ignition delay times of iso-octane and n-heptane under stoichiometric conditions. Symbols are the experimental data [27,4446]. Lines are the simulation results with RMV3.

  • Figure 6

    (Color online) Shock tube ignition delay times of toluene and 1-hexene under stoichiometric conditions. Symbols are the experimental data [4749]. Lines are the simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 7

    (Color online) Shock tube ignition delay times of gasoline surrogate mixtures under stoichiometric conditions. Symbols are the experimental data: P0=1 MPa obtained from Yahyaoui et al. [47], P0=3.04 & 5.07 MPa obtained from Gauthier et al. [46], and P0=11.8–14.8 atm obtained from Ciezki et al. [45]. Lines are the simulation results with RMV3.

  • Figure 8

    Ignition delay times of CH3OH/O2/Ar mixtures in a shock tube. Symbols are the experimental data obtained from Bowman [6]. For mixture 1, 2.0% CH3OH, 4.0% O2 with balance Ar at 1.2–1.7 atm; for mixture 2, 1.0% CH3OH, 2.0% O2 with balance Ar at 2.9–3.6 atm; for mixture 3, 0.75% CH3OH, 1.5% O2 with balance Ar at 3.8–4.5 atm; for mixture 4, 1.0% CH3OH, 1.0% O2 with balance Ar at 2.9–3.3 atm. Lines are the simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 9

    (Color online) Laminar flame speeds of gasoline surrogates. Symbols are the experimental data: T0=353 K & 500 K obtained from Andrae et al. [50], T0=373 K obtained from Jerzembeck et al. [51]. Lines are the simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 10

    (Color online) Atmospheric flame speeds of methanol/air mixtures at initial temperature of 318, 340 and 368 K. Symbols are the experimental data from Held and Dryer [52]. Lines are simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 11

    Laminar flame speeds of methanol gasoline blends. Symbols are the experimental data from Beeckmann et al. [32] and lines are the simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 12

    (Color online) Oxidation of M85 surrogate fuel mixture in JSR at 10 atm. Symbols are the experimental data obtained from Togbé et al. [30]. Lines are the simulation results of RMV3.

  • Figure 13

    Combustion processes for M50 at 2000 r/min and 60% throttle threshold. Solid lines are experimental data and dash lines are simulated values.

  • Figure 14

    (Color online) Emission characteristics for M50 at 2000 r/min and 60% throttle threshold. Symbols are experimental data and solid lines are simulated values.

  • Figure 15

    (Color online) Emission distributions of CO and NO from M50 at 2000 r/min and 60% throttle opening.

  • Table 1   Initial conditions of M85/O/N mixtures in a JSR

    Φ

    Methanol

    Iso-octane

    Toluene

    1-Hexene

    O2

    N2

    P (atm)

    T (K)

    0.6

    0.3805

    0.000098

    0.000068

    0.000029

    0.013013

    0.982987

    10

    700–1100

    1.0

    0.3805

    0.000098

    0.000068

    0.000029

    0.007808

    0.988192

    10

    700–1100

    2.0

    0.3805

    0.000098

    0.000068

    0.000029

    0.003904

    0.992096

    10

    700–1100

  • Table 2   MR479q engine simulation parameters

    Items

    Value

    Bore (mm)

    78.7

    Stroke (mm)

    69

    Connecting rod length (mm)

    122

    Compression ratio

    9.3

    Engine speed (r/min)

    2000

    Intake temperature (K)

    293.15

    Ignition advance angle (°CA)

    15

    Average inlet mass flow (kg/h)

    21.6

    Turbulent model

    k-ε

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