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SCIENCE CHINA Materials, Volume 61, Issue 8: 1049-1056(2018) https://doi.org/10.1007/s40843-017-9215-3

In-situ growth of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets on sponge-like carbon nanospheres for lithium-ion batteries

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  • ReceivedDec 7, 2017
  • AcceptedJan 16, 2018
  • PublishedJan 31, 2018

Abstract

Developing novel electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) with rapid charge/discharge capability and high cycling stability remains a big challenge to date. Herein, we demonstrate the design and synthesis of ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets in-situ grown on sponge-like carbon nanospheres by a simple diffusion-controlled process. The unique sponge-like carbon nanosphere core can be used as “reservoir” of electrolyte by adsorbing to shorten the ion-diffusion path, and meanwhile as “elastomer” to alleviate the structural change of the MoS2 nanosheets during the charge/discharge processes. Furthermore, the vertical ultrathin MoS2 nanosheets with broadened interlayer space greatly enrich the electrochemical active sites. Consequently, the as-obtained MoS2/C nanospheres exhibit increased specific capacities at various rates with superior cycling stability compared to the MoS2/C floccules. It is reckoned that the present concept can be extended to other electrode materials for achieving high-rate and stable LIBs.


Funded by

the National Natural Science Foundation of China(21522602,51672082,91534202)

the Shanghai Rising-Star Program(15QA1401200)

the Innovation Program of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission

the Program for Professor of Special Appointment(Eastern,Scholar)

and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities(222201718002)


Acknowledgment

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21522602, 51672082 and 91534202), the Shanghai Rising-Star Program (15QA1401200), the Innovation Program of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission, the Program for Professor of Special Appointment (Eastern Scholar) at Shanghai Institutions of Higher Learning, and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (222201718002).


Interest statement

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.


Contributions statement

Chen L, Jiang H and Li C conceived the idea and data analysis. Chen L performed the experiments. Hu Y and Wang H helped to discuss partial experimental data. Chen L and Jiang H wrote the paper. All authors contributed to the general discussion.


Author information

Ling Chen is currently a PhD candidate in Materials and Science Engineering under the supervision of Prof. Hao Jiang at East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST). Her research centers on developing transition metal oxides/dichalcogenides for energy storage and conversion.


Hao Jiang received his PhD degree in Materials and Science Engineering from East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST), 2009. He then joined Temasek Laboratories, Nanyang Technological University (NTU) in Singapore, as a research scientist from 2009 to 2011. Now, he is a professor in Key Laboratory for Ultrafine Materials of Ministry of Education at ECUST. His research focuses on the design and synthesis of novel hierarchical nanomaterials for energy storage and conversion.


Chunzhong Li received BSc (1989), MSc (1992) and PhD (1997) from East China University of Science and Technology (ECUST). He became a full professor of School of Materials Science and Engineering in 1998, and now he is the dean of School of Materials Science and Engineering at ECUST. His research interests include functionalization and fabrication of nanomaterials for new energy, environment and relevant applications.


Supplement

Supplementary information

Supporting data are available in the online version of the paper.


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  • Figure 1

    Schematic illustration of the synthesis of MoS2/C nanospheres and the corresponding TEM images of each stage product. Scale bars are 200 nm.

  • Figure 2

    (a) Low-magnification SEM image, (b) low- and (c) high-magnification TEM images, (d) high-resolution TEM image, (e–h) TEM-EDS mapping of the MoS2/C nanospheres.

  • Figure 3

    (a) XRD pattern, (b) Raman spectrum and (c, d) XPS spectra of Mo 3d and S 2p of the MoS2/C nanospheres.

  • Figure 4

    TEM images of products with different sulfidation time: (a) 4 h, (b) 10 h, (c) 14 h, (d) 24 h, and (e) the schematic illustration for the formation of the MoS2/C nanospheres.

  • Figure 5

    (a) The initial three charge/discharge curves of the MoS2/C nanospheres at 0.1 A g−1, (b) rate capacity, (c) cycling performance at 0.2 A g−1, and (d) electrochemical impedance spectra of the MoS2/C nanospheres and MoS2/C floccules.

  • Figure 6

    CV curves at 0.2–1.0 mV s−1 of (a) MoS2/C nanospheres and (b) MoS2/C floccules, (c, d) log i vs. log v plots for gaining obtaining b-values according to the above corresponding redox peaks.

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