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  • ReceivedDec 19, 2017
  • AcceptedApr 18, 2018
  • PublishedMay 14, 2018

Abstract

In recent years, the brain research project has aroused considerable public and governmental attention. Brain imaging technique is an important tool for brain science research, and determining an efficient and effective way to analyze the high-dimensional, multi-modality, heterogenous, and time-variant brain images has become a new hotspot in brain science. In this paper, we first introduce some fundamental methods of brain image analysis, and thereafter review some of our proposed methods in the fields of multi-modal image fusion, brain network construction and analysis, image genomic association analysis, and brain image registration by applying machine learning techniques, especially in the fields of early diagnosis of brain disease and brain decoding.


Funded by

国家优秀青年科学基金(61422204)

国家自然科学基金项目(61473149)


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