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SCIENTIA SINICA Physica, Mechanica & Astronomica, Volume 48, Issue 3: 039504(2018) https://doi.org/10.1360/SSPMA2017-00273

Detection of electromagnetic counterpart for gravitational wave bursts

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  • ReceivedSep 23, 2017
  • AcceptedDec 18, 2017
  • PublishedJan 29, 2018
PACS numbers

Abstract

The direct detection of gravitational waves (GWs) was recently achieved by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) team, which opened a new era of gravitational wave astronomy. With the operation of Advanced LIGO to scientific operation period, and in the next few years the other second generation detectors, such as Advanced Virgo and LIGO-India continuing to be built and put into use, there will be more and more GW signals being detected. Recently, GW signals from NS-NS merger and its electromagnetic (EM) counterpart have also been detected. Because of the faint nature of GW signals, detecting an EM emission signal coincident with a GW signal in both trigger time and spatial direction is essential to confirm the astrophysical origin of the GW signals and study the astrophysical properties of the GW sources (e.g. host galaxy, distance). Due to the poor localization ability of GW wave detectors (Advanced LIGO ~ 10–100 of square degrees), the detection of EM counterpart for GW events with large field of view high energy observational equipment is an urgent demand. Einstein Probe (EP) has a large field of view, all day long observation ability, high sensitivity, fast slewing and pointing capability, fast data downloading and other advantages, provides an ideal facility for the detection of EM counterpart for GW events. The successful operation of the Einstein Probe will promote the development of gravitational wave astronomy and gravitational wave cosmology, and make China in the international leading position for the study of the EM counterpart for the GW source.


Funded by

中国科学院战略性先导科技专项(编号:)

国家重点基础研究发展计划(编号:)


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  • Figure 1

    (Color online) Imaginative illustration of double compact star merger. This figure is taken from http://www.ligo.org/science/GW-Inspiral.php.

  • Figure 2

    (Color online) Summary of potential electromagnetic counterparts of NS-NS mergers with black holes as postmerger products. This figure is taken from Metzger and Berger [35].

  • Figure 3

    (Color online) Summary of potential electromagnetic counterparts of NS-NS mergers with magnetars as post-merger products. This figure is taken from Gao et al. [32].

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