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SCIENCE CHINA Life Sciences, Volume 63 , Issue 4 : 606-609(2020) https://doi.org/10.1007/s11427-020-1668-5

Co-infections of SARS-CoV-2 with multiple common respiratory pathogens in infected patients

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  • ReceivedFeb 17, 2020
  • AcceptedMar 2, 2020
  • PublishedMar 5, 2020

Abstract

There is no abstract available for this article.


Funded by

Guangdong Provincial Science and Technology Program(2019b030301009)

the National Natural Science Foundation of China(81802060)

and the start-up funding of Shenzhen University and the National Science and Technology Major Project(2017ZX10201301)


Acknowledgment

This work was supported by Guangdong Provincial Science and Technology Program (2019b030301009), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (81802060), and the start-up funding of Shenzhen University and the National Science and Technology Major Project (2017ZX10201301).


Interest statement

The author(s) declare that they have no conflict of interest.


Supplement

SUPPORTING INFORMATION

Supplementary file 1 Materials and methods and approaches evaluation results.

Supplementary file 2 Individual characteristics for these patients including age, gender, days after onset, and clinical features.

Supplementary file 3 Comparison between the GeneoDX (1) and Uni-MEDICA (2) method for detecting 2019 novel coronavirus in patients.

Supplementary file 4 Co-infection of SARS-CoV-2 with other pathogens or merely other pathogen infections.

Supplementary file 5 Sequence for 4 more SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory positive cases infections.

The supporting information is available online at http://life.scichina.com and https://link.springer.com. The supporting materials are published as submitted, without typesetting or editing. The responsibility for scientific accuracy and content remains entirely with the authors.


References

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  • Table 1   Comparisons of clinical symptoms, blood routine test results and epidemiologic risks between different infection categories

    Infection type

    Cases

    Fever

    Cough

    Dyspnea

    Chest CT

    Leukopenia

    Lymphocyte normal

    Lymphopenia

    No epidemiologic risksa)

    Patients with epidemiologic risks and minor signs

    SARS-CoV-2-suspectedpatients

    Single SARS-CoV-2

    86

    61

    40

    6

    55

    9

    76

    13

    8

    15

    63

    Co-infections of SARS-CoV-2 and RDVsb)

    6

    1

    1

    0

    4

    2

    3

    2

    1

    1

    4

    Other RDVs positive

    18

    15

    13

    1

    12

    1

    15

    5

    5

    2

    11

    All negative

    76

    60

    42

    4

    52

    4

    68

    12

    17

    6

    53

    Those patients are diagnosed as SARS-CoV-2-suspected patients when they have one epidemiological risk and two clinical features below according to the official instruction for diagnosing and treatment of 2019 novel coronavirus infections issued by the National Health Commission of the People’s Republic of China. Epidemiologic risks include three conditions below: (1) Patients have been resident or traveled to Wuhan and its nearby cities in Hubei province, China in the past two weeks. (2) Patients have contact with people who presented a fever or respiratory disease symptoms and had a travel history to Wuhan and its nearby cities in the past two weeks. (3) Patients have contacted people with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the past two weeks. Clinical features: (1) Fever, temperature over 37.3. (2) The patient’s chest CT scan presents a pneumonia symptom including apparent extrapulmonary band, the ground glass opacity, or sub-segmental areas of consolidation. (3) Normal or decreased white blood cell counts or reduced lymphocyte counts in blood routine tests at the earlier stage of the disease. b) RDVs indicate the other 14 respiratory tract disease viruses excluding the SARS-CoV-2 that were simultaneously screened by our multiplex kit.

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